LABOR’S $10 MILLION CAIRNS INDIGENOUS EDUCATION FIRST YOUTH FOYER

2 May 2019

A Shorten Labor Government will build an innovative $10 million Education Indigenous First Youth Foyer student accommodation complex in Cairns for young people aged 16 to 24 at risk of or experiencing homelessness.

LABOR’S $10 MILLION CAIRNS INDIGENOUS EDUCATION FIRST YOUTH FOYER

A Shorten Labor Government will build an innovative $10 million Education Indigenous First Youth Foyer student accommodation complex in Cairns for young people aged 16 to 24 at risk of or experiencing homelessness.

The Foyer will provide up to two years’ accommodation and support for at risk young people so they have the support they need to properly engage in housing, education and employment.

Up to 40 students will have their own apartment with easy access to public transport, shops, employment and community services.

It will be located on the TAFE Queensland Cairns campus, adjacent to CQUniversity and near other education facilities including schools and James Cook University.

The Foyer will be staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week and will include post-placement support for students for six months after students leave the Foyer.

Students must participate and attain accreditation in six key areas – education, employment, social connections, health and wellbeing, civic participation and housing and living skills.

Cairns has a lower rate of school completion (54.7 per cent), low bachelor level attainment rates (14.3 per cent) and a higher rate of youth unemployment (13.4 per cent) compared to the national average.

In the last Census, 2,362 people in Cairns reported being homeless, double the Queensland average.
Students will be supported by Foyer staff, volunteer mentors, local employers and other community sector agencies.

The Foyer aims to stop young people’s long term involvement with income support, social housing, support services and corrections.

There are about 15 Foyers across Australia, supporting between 10 to 98 young people using various accommodation models including congregate facilities, dispersed housing, and networked or mixed accommodation options.

Research demonstrates that the Foyers have resulted in significant improvements in education, employment and housing outcomes for students that are sustained 12 months after leaving.

Findings include:

  • 72 per cent completed Year 12, a Certificate III or higher.
  • 39 per cent were employed a year after.
  • 49 per cent were renting or owned their own home.
  • 32 per cent were living with friends, family and relatives.
  • Only 3 per cent were found to be living in ‘crisis’, down from 26 per cent.
  • Improved mental and physical health being reported by students.

This election is a choice between Labor’s plan for better support for Indigenous young people, or bigger tax loopholes for the top end of town under the LNP.

After six years of LNP cuts and chaos, our united Labor team is ready.


TUESDAY, 30 APRIL 2019