SENATOR CAMERON INTERVIEW ABC Melbourne 774- Re: FRASER ANNING

18 Mar 2019

Mornings with Jon Faine – ABC Melbourne 774 - Re: Fraser Anning comments

SENATOR THE HON. DOUG CAMERON
SHADOW MINISTER FOR HOUSING AND HOMELESSNESS
SHADOW MINISTER FOR SKILLS, TAFE AND APPRENTICESHIPS
SENATOR FOR NEW SOUTH WALES
 


E&OE TRANSCRIPT
INTERVIEW
Mornings with Jon Faine – ABC Melbourne 774
MONDAY 18 March 2019
 
SUBJECT/S: Fraser Anning
 
Jon Faine: Ironically for this morning, long before the Christchurch events took place we had accepted a request from Senator Doug Cameron, Labor Party Senator for New South Wales, to come in this morning to tell us about an inquiry that he is involved in as he is doing his lap of honour before the federal election.
 
Doug Cameron is in my studio but I think events have overtaken us Doug Cameron, good morning to you.
 
SENATOR DOUG CAMERON, SHADOW MINISTER FOR HOUSING AND HOMELESSNESS, SHADOW MINISTER FOR SKILLS, TAFE AND APPRENTICESHIPS:  Good morning Jon.
 
FAINE: Instead I would rather hear from you about the proposal for the Senate to do something about one of your very own colleagues.
 
CAMERON: Yes I just think it’s absolutely essential that Fraser Anning is brought to heel in terms of his terrible comments that he made.
 
FAINE: So what do you do?
 
CAMERON: Well, all we can do is sanction him.
 
FAINE: What does that actually mean?
 
CAMERON: That means that the Senate makes a clear and unequivocal statement about their concern and abhorrence to the situation that he has brought to bear on this terrible situation in New Zealand.
 
FAINE: And he says thank you very much, the more attention you pay me the better my prospects of getting more than 19 votes this time around when I seek re-election.
 
CAMERON: Well he might get twenty votes you know, I don’t think...
 
FAINE: But it could make it two thousand – who knows?
 
CAMERON: Well if he gets two thousand votes he still doesn’t come back, that’s the reality. This guy is not coming back to the Senate. He is a creature of Pauline Hanson and I just think we have to also recognise that Pauline Hanson has been behind a lot of this and brought these people into the Senate to run these terrible racist positions.
 
FAINE: Well Pauline Hanson only gets there because there are people who vote for her. There are people in our Australian community who support those views. They vote just like your union mates vote so they are entitled to be represented.
 
What do we do about people who have racist white supremacist views and they have their champion in the Parliament just like anyone else?
 
CAMERON: You need leadership from government. You need the Government calling out racist positions. You can’t have a Government whose members in the Senate vote for a resolution that says it’s OK to be white.
 
You need a government out there who actually deals with the issues and recognises the terrific input and contribution that Muslim Australians and Muslim migrants make to this country.
 
I just think it’s terrible what has been happening and this Government has got a lot to answer for.
 
FAINE: I think the Greens have said they want to expel him. Do you actually have the power to do so?
 
CAMERON: As I understand it we don’t have the power to expel.
 
FAINE: Should you have the power? Should the Senate have the power to expel one of its own? That could be misused as much as it is useful.
 
CAMERON: Yeah, probably not. I mean the eventual decision is by the electorate and they will make a decision on this guy and I am sure that they will get rid of him. He won’t be back and I just hope that they make a clear statement about One Nation as well.
 
FAINE: We are not alone in the international community in having these views. In France they had a federal election, a national election recently where Marie Le Pen was promoting these views and she was the runner up. So we are not immune to what is going on around the world are we?
 
CAMERON: No, I don’t think we are immune but I think it needs leadership from government; it needs leadership from the Prime Minister. We don’t want the hypocrisy that we have this morning from Peter Dutton, out there trying to pretend it’s everybody else’s fault but his and then comparing the Greens to Fraser Anning.
 
I mean this is just terrible. I have watched this in Parliament, I have watched Pauline Hanson walk in with a burqa, I have watched the decision being made by Liberal and National politicians to support it’s OK to be white. I mean we really need to call this out and we need to stand up against it.
 
 
FAINE: One of the concerns I have is that - I hear every word that you are saying – but that’s making politics in Australia even more tribal and one of the problems we have is we have become so tribal in the last 10 years or so already, and we used to have a sensible centre but now it’s polarised.
 
How’s that happened? Why’s it happened? What do we do about it?
 
CAMERON: Well it’s happened in the time I have been involved in politics both as a union official and as a senator. I have seen a position where Pauline Hanson has moved from being on the fringes of politics to the centre of politics in the Senate.
 
I have seen people I would have thought would have been better than that like Arthur Sinodinos say that One Nation are now more sophisticated. They are not more sophisticated. They are racists, they are creating division and disunity in this country and they need to be called out.
 
FAINE: Sorry to talk to you exclusively about something other than what you came in to talk about.
 
CAMERON: I can understand that.
 
FAINE: I am glad you can because I think it was just inevitable after the news on Friday and when we understood the enormity of it everything else suddenly becomes less significant. Thank you for coming in regardless this morning and thank you for your contribution.
 
CAMERON: And let’s talk about housing and homelessness soon.
 
FAINE: Which is also very important and we shall.
 
ENDS
Authorised by Noah Carroll, ALP, Canberra.