ASSISTANT MINISTER FOR SKILLS KAREN ANDREWS M.I.I. - MISSING IN INDIA - FOR SKILLS WEEK

1 Sep 2017

Assistant Minister for Skills, Karen Andrews MP, has spent National Skills Week 2017 in India. She has posted on Facebook that she wants to help India become the skills capital of the world.

Assistant Minister for Skills, Karen Andrews MP, has spent National Skills Week 2017 in India. She has posted on Facebook that she wants to help India become the skills capital of the world.

Well Labor wants Australia to be the skills capital of the world.

It beggars belief that the Assistant Minister for Skills decides to go to India during National Skills Week.

Labor has no problem with promoting Australia in India, but there are two other Coalition Ministers already there, and nobody in Australia representing the Turnbull government or promoting National Skills Week.

It’s bad enough that the Assistant Minister has gone to India to wax lyrical about India’s skills agenda during National Skills Week. The real problem is her policies.

The Coalition’s policy on skills is a national joke. It’s like a comedy script from Utopia.

Under the Coalition, the only source of funds for training Australians is visas fees paid by foreign skilled workers. The more foreign skilled workers used, the lower the need for Australian skills. Conversely, the lower the number of overseas workers paying fees, the less money available for training Australians.

Labor has a positive alternative. Labor has announced policies that will increase the number of apprentices and put TAFE back at the centre of our vocational education and training system.

We’ll invest $100 million into revitalising TAFE campuses across regional and outer metro areas. Two-thirds of all vocational education and training funding under Labor will go to TAFE. We’ll ensure that at least 1 in 10 workers on major government sites is an apprentice.

We’ll provide re-training for older workers and Labor will put back in the $600 million that the Turnbull government cut from TAFE and apprenticeships in the 2017 Budget.

National Skills Week, as a non-government led initiative to promote skills, is a testament to the passion for skills and training that exists in Australia. It is unfortunate the Turnbull government simply does not share that commitment.